• Cromer RNLI

Two shore crew at RNLI pass plans

Two crew members at RNLI Cromer have passed important tests, which enable them to be fully operational members of crew.



Rose Syer, Left - Emma Tuck, Right


Rose Syer is now a Winch driver. This role is in charge of pulling the lifeboat in once it is on the slip, under the direction of the Coxswain. Once the spans are connected to the life boat then she will be under the command of the head launcher right up to when we are ready for launch again.


 The spans are what are hooked onto the boat over the stern cleats; these are connected to the winch rope. The lifeboat is then bought to the doors and put on the Quarter stops, which are connected to the wall in the boathouse well. The other end of these pass over the Samson post (towing bollard) and let the weight of the boat onto them, (Quarter stops are a continuous loop), once on the Quarter stops the weight is let off the winch rope. Then they remove the spans from the boat and pass them down to the slip crew, who disconnect them from the winch rope and stow them on the well wall.


The sea catch is then connected to the recovery pin on the stern of the boat, the winch rope is then connected to the sea catch and the lifeboat is brought into the boathouse to the launch position.


In the same week Emma Tuck passed the relevant assessments to become a Head Launcher.


This roles entails being in command of the slip crew and winch driver, she has the job of making sure everything and everyone is safe on the slip, between her and the coxswain the boat is brought back into the boathouse ready for its next service or exercise, nothing moves without her say so, she is in constant coms with the coxswain.


John Redmond, Lifeboat Operations Manager for Cromer’s RNLI Lifeboat, says: ‘We are very proud of these crew who have worked hard and with a lot of dedication to pass these requirements to become fully trained shore crew’.

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ABOUT US

In Cromer there are two boathouses, one for the All-Weather Lifeboat "Lester" on the pier and the other for the Inshore Lifeboat on the east promenade. This boathouse was originally built in 1902 for the then rowing and sailing lifeboat Louisa Heartwell. Also on the east promenade you'll find the Henry Blogg Lifeboat Museum. The whole town is proud of the man referred to as 'the greatest of the lifeboatmen', who gained national fame in the first half of the 20th century when navigation around the Norfolk coastline was particularly hazardous in easterly gales.