• Cromer RNLI

RNLI Cromer Christmas Card Competition – a message from our Coxswain

My name is Paul - and I am the Coxswain/Mechanic at Cromer lifeboat station.This year has been very challenging for everyone so I have decided to try and lighten things up a bit.


I would like to see you all design a Christmas card for Cromer Lifeboat Station. We have three

age categories: 10years and under, 11-18years and 19-100years. Don’t worry if you are over 100, we would still like to have your entry!


The winning cards in each age category will win a special prize!


To enter, please make a donation of £1, or whatever amount you would like, to the RNLI’s Christmas Appeal visit: RNLI.org/Xmas.


Please send a photo of your card, plus a second photo of you holding it up – post them on our

Facebook page or tweet us at @CromerRNLI.


The closing date for entries is 19 December with the winner being announced on 21 December.


We hope to have the winning cards printed and sold in RNLI shops in the future.


Your cards can be a novelty or funny card or wherever your mood takes you. If you want to make it unique to Cromer, the two boats we have here are our ALB,Lester, number 16-07 and

our D Class George and Muriel, number D-734.


On behalf of everyone here at Cromer station we would like to wish you all a merry Christmas

and a very happy new year, thanks for supporting the RNLI and we look forward to seeing all

your fantastic designs, stay safe and good luck.

 

Paul Watling, Coxswain/Mechanic, Cromer LBS.




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ABOUT US

In Cromer there are two boathouses, one for the All-Weather Lifeboat "Lester" on the pier and the other for the Inshore Lifeboat on the east promenade. This boathouse was originally built in 1902 for the then rowing and sailing lifeboat Louisa Heartwell. Also on the east promenade you'll find the Henry Blogg Lifeboat Museum. The whole town is proud of the man referred to as 'the greatest of the lifeboatmen', who gained national fame in the first half of the 20th century when navigation around the Norfolk coastline was particularly hazardous in easterly gales.